Photography is something I have been fascinated with since I was a little boy. One of my earliest memories is running around the woods in the full moon with a Kodak disc camera. When the film was processed the sky was blue and the photos looked like it was high noon because of the exposure. It was real life magic and I was hooked.

At times a hobby, a passion, an occupation, and obsession. Taking photos feels almost necessary to me, a tiny bit of acknowledgement and recognition of the incredible gift of life, souvenirs from the beautiful randomness of existence. I am a hoarder of moments with trouble accepting the transient nature of things. I seek to find those slivers of an experience, freeze it in time to consider it, reflect and feel gratitude or wonder, confusion or sadness, emotion summoned from that moment to return to again and again. The culmination of light, activity, location, and gear the possibilities as endless as the chance of experience.

Photo of me (Zac Folk) and a street dog in a town in Peru.
Hanging out with a random dog in Peru

I particularly like shooting film, and feel more soul from the celluloid, comforted by the fact I can touch it and hold it up to the light. The useful, practical digital photography I eventually found some love and appreciation for the practicality of it, digital is my go to for things like shooting the stars and for motion, time-lapse projects. But, for me, the over century-old technology of trapping light in silver grains of emulsion, in a physical, finite, object adds an entire new layer of chance and unpredictability from the physical world to make an image truly unique.

Toy cameras like the Holga are, like life, inherently unpredictable. The light leaks, the intentional and unintentional multiple exposures with little more than a gut feeling, a guess, a type of Zen when shooting with the simple plastic box. One does not need to consider anything outside the present moment. No buttons to fiddle with, or knobs to twist, the photos just seem to work when the outside eyes are closed and the inner eye is open. Photography seems more grounded to me when it shares the aesthetic of wabi-sabi, the beauty of imperfection that is part of life.

Though I have had this website for over twenty years now, I am just dusting it off after nearly a decade of neglect. My career in web development consumed me for a while but I am slowly returning to what is important to me. Luckily those skills help me here and I was able to build this exactly how I want it. The website I built as a WordPress theme and will soon be sharing that with the community. It is early stages but I would love to have some feedback testers if you are interested reach out!

I am also starting to build up my social sites and would truly appreciate any help building my presence (I don’t really know what I am doing) so please share and all that good stuff, it really helps more than you can know.

Please reach out if you have any questions or would possibly like to work together. You can send me a message at zachary@folkphotography.com or use the form below.